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Template for LIBRARIAN USE only: Credible Source? The SIFT Method

For Librarians Only - Source of box mappings

This page includes...

  • Prompts and Examples from Michael A. Caulfield and others
  • Videos from Michael A. Caulfield and Civix Canada dealing wth the "I" "F" and "T" of SIFT
  • Link to interactive practice tutorial evaluating images, from Civix Canada 
  • FactChecking website list with links
  • Additional possible resources, including Caulfield's OER textbook
  • Summary notes on the SIFT method
  • First draft of an acknowledgement for our sources (bottom box).

Prompts, Examples, Links

The following prompts are from Mike Caulfield at this Wayne State page: https://guides.lib.wayne.edu/sift/investigate

"I" INVESTIGATE THE SOURCE

Alligator prompt:

Alligator discussion:

MH17 prompt with videos

MH17 discussion 

Warming Claims Prompt: (evaluating "expertise" is contextual)

Warming Claims discussion

Prompt: Foundation for a Smoke Free World 

Discussion: Foundation for a Smoke Free World -- this gets into "bias" and "agenda"

 

"F" FIND TRUSTED COVERAGE / FIND TRUSTED SOURCES

Keanu Reeves prompt

Chik-Fil-A Example using Fact Checker

Nikki Haley dance protest? prompt

Nikki Haley dance protest discussion, including falsely framing/contextualizing real photos.  (?? Is this about finding trusted coverage or tracking down the original context?  Both?)

ATM rats prompt

ATM rats discussion

John Lennon photo prompt

John Lennon photo discussion 

 

TRACE THE CLAIM

I didn't grab the prompts yet.  The lesson starts here: https://www.notion.so/Lesson-Five-Trace-Claims-Quotes-and-Media-to-Their-Original-Context-06fb635bccc04569b8afe6dee13236d5 

 

EXAMPLES FROM OTHER SOURCES

PEDIATRIC WEBSITES

American College of Pediatricians = https://www.acpeds.org/ 

American Academy of Pediatrics = https://www.aap.org/en-us/Pages/Default.aspx  

Church of Scientology Website

Drug Free World https://www.drugfreeworld.org/  

Fact Checking - Full List (create subsets for teaching)

  • AFP FactCheck -  journalists investigate and disprove false information, focusing on items that can be harmful, impactful and manipulative.
  • Climate Feedback - network of scientists investigating claims about and media coverage of climate change.
  • Factcheck -- nonpartisan and nonprofit, "aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics"
  • Hoax-Slayer - debunks email and social media hoaxes; posts news about internet scams.
  • NPR Fact Check - National Public Radio's current and archived articles fact-checking statements of politicians.
  • Politifact​-- sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times, an independent newspaper, this website "checks claims by elected officials, candidates, leaders of political parties and political activists." 
  • Pundifact -- also sponsored by the Tamba Bay Times, specifically checking claims made by "pundits" or the so-called experts and opinion makers frequently interviewed on news programs
  • Quote Investigator -  Respected quote-investigaor Garson O’Toole provides citations to support his conclusions about quote attributions.
  • SciCheck - sponsored by FactCheck.Orf, identifies false or misleading scientific claims.
  • Snopes -- well-respected website that gets to the bottom of urban legends and national rumors.
  • Truth Be Tolda non-profit, non-partisan, sponsored by Howard University’s Department of Media, Journalism and Film in the School of Communications, examines claims about the black community in public debate. 
  • Washington Post Fact Checker - Award-winning fact-checking website, goal is to "truth-squad" statements made by elected officials and government leaders.

More Resources for Librarians

OER book: Web Literacy for Student Fact Checkers by Michael A. Caulfield, licensed under CC-BY 4.0.

Wayne State University Guide to SIFT

A nice gallery layout for the 4 steps of SIFT: Stop, Investigate, Find, Trace by Rio Hondo College Library.  Bad color scheme, though. Not enough contrast for ADA compliance.  The use of the LibGuide "gallery" tool makes the 4 steps always clearly visible and it is easy for the student to navigate.

 

SIFT - beginning notes only

STOP

 

INVESTIGATE the source

  • "knowing the expertise and agenda of the source is crucial to your interpretation of what they say." source: https://www.notion.so/Introducing-SIFT-04db7879dd7a4efaa76bfb2397d11ffd 
  • "Taking sixty seconds to figure out where it is from before reading will help you decide if it is worth your time, and if it is, help you to better understand its significance and trustworthiness." source: https://www.notion.so/Introducing-SIFT-04db7879dd7a4efaa76bfb2397d11ffd 
  • Quoting from a different page, "For example, a fitness instructor might be a great person for advice on a fitness routine, but you wouldn't get medical advice from them. Likewise, you might ask your doctor about an illness or medical condition, but you wouldn't expect them to be an expert in aerobics." source: https://www.notion.so/Alligator-discussion-6e11d1ed329b4b78a5ef6497bddeff70

 

FIND trustworthy coverage

  • "find the best source you can that covers this, or, just as importantly, scan multiple sources to see what the consensus seems to be."  source:https://www.notion.so/Introducing-SIFT-04db7879dd7a4efaa76bfb2397d11ffd 
  • Paraphrasing from  second video on this page https://www.notion.so/Lesson-Two-Investigate-the-Source-dc0ab0dc7c394df9bcab6ffdb4edf626  : in order to find out about the credibilty of a website, don't look at what the website /organization says about itself; instead, look at what the web (or others or trustworthy sources) says about that organizatoin.   

 

TRACE claims, quotes, media back to orginal context

 

 

DO WE WANT VOCABULARY?  Below is copied and pasted from https://www.notion.so/Introducing-the-Notebook-Reflection-Prompts-and-In-Depth-56e766d9b0bd441290c6a26ee201f40f

  • For the purpose of this course, a claim is a statement that purports to express something about reality. "The U.S. landed a space craft on the moon in 1969" is a relatively simple claim that is true. "The moon landing of 1969 was fake." is a simple claim that is false. "The mission to land on the moon was driven by Cold War fear more than scientific curiousity" is a complex claim one can have a range of opinions on, but is still, for a given context, either a well-supported claim, a controversial claim, or a claim lacking any real support.
  • A source is the place where a claim or other information can be found. This course is a source of information about disinformation. Most claims can be found in multiple sources. You might find information about the moon landing in the Wall Street Journal, a website like Gizmodo, a textbook, a research paper, or a video recording of astronauts talking about the mission.

 

 

Find Trustworthy Sites

Video produced by Civix Canada, a non-partisan, national registered charity dedicated to building the skills and habits of active and engaged citizenship among young Canadians.

Investigate the Source

Video produced by Civix Canada, a non-partisan, national registered charity dedicated to building the skills and habits of active and engaged citizenship among young Canadians.

Trace to Original Context using Reverse Image Search

Video produced by Civix Canada, a non-partisan, national registered charity dedicated to building the skills and habits of active and engaged citizenship among young Canadians.

Fact-Check an Image in 3 Steps

Try this skill - check the facts with just 3 steps to determine whether each picture is true or false.  

Created by Civix Canada, a non-partisan, national registered charity dedicated to building the skills and habits of active and engaged citizenship among young Canadians.

Social media post with Xray image of over 500 teeth

Trace to Original Context - Words

Video created by  Michael Caulfield's "Check, Please!" course at http://lessons.checkplease.cc.   From "Lesson Five: Trace Claims, Quotes, and Media to Their Original Context."

Acknowledgement

Note: This SIFT method guide was adapted from Michael Caulfield's "Check, Please!" course at http://lessons.checkplease.cc. The text and media is (for the most part) CC-BY, and free for reuse and revision. The authors ask that people copying this course leave this note intact, so that students and instructors can find their way back to the original (periodically updated) version if necessary. 

INTRO BOX

SIFT means: STOP..., INVESTIGATE the source..., FIND better coverage..., and TRACE the original claim.

The guides on this page are all based on the work of Michael Caulfield's "Check, Please!" course at http://lessons.checkplease.cc. The text and media is licensed (for the most part) CC-BY, and free for reuse and revision. The authors ask that people copying materials from this course leave this note intact, so that students and instructors can find their way back to the original (periodically updated) version if necessary.